John Waterhouse

John Waterhouse

John William Waterhouse, Fellow of the Royal Academy of Arts (6 April 1849 - 10 February 1917), is an English artist known for his work in the style of the Pre-Raphaelites. It has been in operation for several decades after the collapse of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, which flourished in the mid-nineteenth century, and is therefore referred to as "modern pre-Raphaelite" [1]. His works are characterized by their depictions of women of ancient Greek mythology and the legend of Arthur, and show stylistic influence not only on the part of the pro-Raphaelites, but also by his contemporary Impressionists.

Born in Italy by English artist parents, he later moved to London where he enrolled at the Royal Academy of Arts. He soon began participating in the Academy's annual summer exhibitions, focusing on the creation of large canvases depicting scenes from everyday life and the mythology of ancient Greece. He later embraced the art style of the Pre-Raphaelites, even though it had gone out of style on the British art scene several decades before.

Although not as well known as early pre-Raphaelite artists such as Dante Gabriel Rosetti, John Mille and William Holman Hunt, Waterhouse's work is today exhibited in several major British art galleries, and in 2009 the Royal Academy of Arts organized a major retrospective of the work. his.